What is your Flickr stratergy?

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A little while ago I found Issuu. Issuu is a digital publishing platform which allows companies and individuals publish books and magazines for free. I have found some really great content on Issuu and the other day I came across Explore Flickr by Swiss Photographer Thomas Leuthard.

I have been using Flickr for a while now but with no real plan in mind. I chose Flickr based on the fact that I already had some friends that were using it and when I picked up a camera again it seemed like as good a place as any to share my work. Much like in the days of chemical photography an image is no good to anyone if it is left unseen. In our digital age we have swapped draws of negatives for hard drives full of digital files.

One of the questions Thomas suggests you ask yourself is “Why am I a Flickr user?”. Unlike Thomas I don’t make any money from my photography. It is a creative release for me rather than an income stream and so building up a profile with a view to generating interest from prospective clients isn’t what I want. So what was I using Flickr for? Is it OK to simply use it as a modern day photo album?

Looking back at the first pictures I shared on Flickr I can instantly see how I have grown as a photographer. Both my technical and creative ability has improved and this is a pretty good feeling. I believe that I have come to an important point in my photography and I want to continue to grow and see my work branch out and become a reflection of myself and how I see the world. So to answer the question why am I a Flickr user?; I want to build my portfolio and share my work with other photographers, to get constructive criticism and find inspiration from the work of others.

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So whilst some of the strategies and ideas given in Thomas’ book won’t help me reach my personal goal some of them seem to be a good fit. Here is a short summary of the changes I have made to the way I use Flickr:

Don’t upload straight away
I have created a new collection in Lightroom called ‘To publish’. Instead of publishing images on the day I process them I first move them to this collection and leave them there a couple of days. This gives me some time away from an imagine after I have finished working on it and helps me to see it differently when I come back to it. A few images have been edited or rejected all together because of this strategy and I think my portfolio is better for it.

Upload no more than one image a day
This helps with the first strategy but it also means that my portfolio has more regular updates which makes it more likely to get some feedback from other Flickr users.

Upload to more relevant groups
I now think more about which groups I upload my images to. I spent some time looking at the groups my favourite photographers contribute to and I searched for some new groups that I thought had interesting content. I also sought out some groups that are specific to my local area where I live and made some connections with local photographers.

Compare each newly uploaded image against similar images on Flickr
One way to critique your own work is to compare it against others. I now spend some time looking at similar images after each upload and think about what has drawn me to any given picture and how I might have changed my own work to include different ideas and viewpoints.

Leave it a couple of days before adding pictures to groups
Thomas suggests that this is a good strategy for getting your images to be selected for Flickr Explored but I like to do this to see how much interest and image gets organically before it is added to any groups. Whilst not very scientific it does give me some indication of whether or not people think it is a picture worth looking at.

Give feedback to others
If I want to get feedback on my own work then it makes sense to be more involved with the Flickr community as a whole. I find that giving feedback in groups that I contribute to or to photographers that I follow also helps me to think about what has drawn me to their image and how I might apply similar ideas to my own photography.

Follow photographers you find interesting
I have always regularly looked at the images of the photographers I follow. With the iPhone app it is easy to keep up to date with new images and if nothing else it inspires me to pick up my camera or process my next batch of RAW files. Unlike Thomas however I don’t follow somebody just because they follow me, I wan’t the pictures in my Flickr feed to inspire me and give me ideas or something to aim for.

After making these simple changes to the way that I use Flickr I honestly feel like this has helped me to improve my portfolio. I have still got a long way to go but that is all part of the fun.

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